Tag Archive: toronto district school board


Racist police too? Who knew?!

Wow, African schools just can’t catch a break, can they? I was reading Pride newspaper this week and learned about an email sent by a senior police inspector to several staff, entitled “Afrocentric Math for Toronto’s new black only school.” One question asks: “Ramon has an AK-47 with a 30-round clip. He usually misses six out of every 10 shots and he uses 13 rounds per drive-by shooting. How many drive-by shootings can Ramon attempt before he has to reload?”

Well, I also learned that the police inspector was suspended over this mess. That’s what I call results! Can we get somebody suspended at the Globe and Mail too? Let’s work on it.

http://www.thestar.com/News/Ontario/article/304040

http://www.thestar.com/News/GTA/article/303904

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Let’s keep the pressure on, people. Here are some good examples to give you ideas for your own letter — as well as responses to that rubberstamped apology. Remember:You can leave comments directly for the Globe and Mail at www.theglobeandmail.com/feedback. You can also email letters@globeandmail.com or fax to 416.585.5085. Click here to see the original post. Let’s take action!

Here is a Call to Action from Louis:

“Hello All,

I know that you will have all seen or heard about this cartoon that was published in the Globe and Mail newspaper. This is totally unacceptable and requires a quick and immediate response from our community. There is no way that the Globe and Mail would have published a similar cartoon attacking the Jewish, Chinese or Gay communities in Toronto. The questions now are…..what was their motivation and how will we respond?

Respectfully,
Louis”
Here is some timely advice from Kay:

“Silent protest will not accomplish anything in this glaring case of a
rascism. Please find attached additional comments and an avenue to make
your voice heard.

Please also send to the the following, we pay taxes:
http://www.premier.gov.on.ca/feedback/default.asp

The big cheeses:
pcrawley@globeandmail.com – Phillip Crawley, Publisher and CEO

egreenspon@globeandmail.com – Edward Greenspon, Editor-in-chief

Also make sure to CC the Chief, so that they can’t sweep it under the rug:
Barbara.Hall@ohrc.on.ca or cco@ohrc.on.ca – Barbara Hall, B.A, LL.B, Ph.D (hon)
Chief Commissioner, Ontario Human Rights Commission

Thanks,
Kay”

This response was sent via email to Kristen, a Globe and Mail reader. It is from Gerald Owen, reader response editor at the Globe and Mail. I received it as a forward from a colleague.

“Thank you for your letter, to which Mr. Greenspon has asked me to reply.

Yesterday morning, the first four letters on the letters to the editor page all complained about this cartoon.

The intention of the cartoonist was not racist. Rather, the idea was that mathematics, one of the essential elements of education, does not vary with ethnicity, though language often does. The cartoon was therefore critical of the proposal for a black-focused school in Toronto, and this was expressed by the words “Afrocentric algebra …” at the top. We regret that it was offensive to a considerable number of readers.
yours truly,

Gerald Owen
reader response editor”

Your thoughts? As far as apologies go, do you think this goes far enough? And do you agree that mathematics does not vary with ethnicity? Wow, there are so many issues at stake here.

Globe and Mail - Racist Cartoon
This cartoon ran in the Monday, February 18, 2008 edition of the Globe and Mail. This is their opinion of Afrocentric Algebra. And this is why we need our African-Centered Schools. Because if anybody knew REAL history, they would know Africans were the ones who created and taught Math to the world.

I have to site some serious references and we have to write some serious letters to these people. Don’t turn your backs! If you want to post your comments here, click the link about. I will make sure that they get to the right people. I don’t know who drew this cartoon. If it was an African, that makes it sadder than ever. But more importantly, we have to make sure our children know their history and know that we have a lot more going for us than ‘Sup Dog. Ridiculous! And don’t talk to me about having a sense of humour. When it comes to putting Black people down and trying to make us look stupid, the history is just too fresh. My generation was still being put back a grade on arrival to Canada as a matter of routine! This is no laughing matter.

Our dedicated sister Yolisa sent these comments:

I am responding to the offensive racist cartoon in your paper on Monday Feb. 18th, the first family Day holiday, no less.
This cartoon caricature exposes a deeply racist Euro-Canadian mindset that shamelessly promotes these stereotypes of Afrikan/Blak people, much less a teacher. This type of racism is fueling the hysteria toward Africentric schools, a desperately needed option for learners and their families who confront racism everyday at school.
This cartoon is exactly why we need Africentric schools where learners are ‘safe’ from such blatant racist behaviour from educators and administrators. In a mainstream school this probably wouldn’t even be talked about but could be the basis of an entire unit on Race & Racism in Canada in an Africentric school.
Not only does this betray ignorance & hate, it also exposes fear that Africentric schools will actually make a difference that threatens the status quo.
For a national paper, you should be ashamed and owe the collective Afrikan/Blak community an apology. Furthermore, the person who created this cartoon should be fired and made to undergo anti-racism training as well as community service in the Afrikan/Blak community!
All Canadians should be outraged by this not just those who are for Africentric schools. Everyone who is committed to anti-racism should hold this paper accountable!

All Canadians should be outraged by this not just those who are for Africentric schools. Everyone who is committed to anti-racism should hold this paper accountable!”
So let’s follow our sister’s advice and hold this paper accountable. You can leave comments directly for the Globe and Mail at www.theglobeandmail.com/feedback. You can also email letters@globeandmail.com or fax to 416.585.5085. I wish we could totally bombard these people. But every one letter makes a difference. No matter how short or long, say SOMETHING! Click on the heading to leave your comments.
Visit this link for another comment – from Jason Robinson from AKA Activist – www.akaactivist.org.

So Black-focused schools have been approved by the Toronto District School Board. All I can say is, I wonder what all the fuss is about? I don’t know too much about “black-focused” but I can tell you that my children have been thriving at an African-Centered school for over three years now. And there have been African-Centered schools in Canada for much longer than that. We’re paying out of pocket for it and it is more than worth it. Next issue: fighting to pull our tax dollars out of the public school system and have the choice to put those dollars toward the educational institute of our choice!

Yes, Black schools: To all those who were arguing about if we should or we shouldn’t have it — sorry, we already have it, have had it and have been having it for quite some time now, if anybody cared to notice. And we’re not alone. Check out this article that we published in the Spring 2006 Black Woman and Child. Special thanks to Angelot Ndongmo.

On the Frontlines Report: African-Centered Schools

“For decades, black mothers have put their faith in public and private school systems that have failed them miserably. Our children are still complaining of racism, unfair treatment, a lack of understanding of their cultural heritage and the frustration of having to learn about every other race’s contributions except their own. African mothers are no different from any other mother when it comes to wanting the best educational experience for their children. These parents desperately need a resolution to help steer their children away from a life of hardship or crime which seem to be gripping countless black youth.”

Click here to read the full article.

Click on the heading to leave your comments.